Backyard Economy

5. November–23. Dezember 2022

Eröffnung: 4. November 2022, 18 Uhr

Universitätsgalerie im Heiligenkreuzerhof

Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien

Sala Terrena, Erdgeschoss, Stiege 7
Schönlaterngasse 5
1010 Wien

Öffnungszeiten: Mittwoch–Samstag, 14–18 Uhr, freier Eintritt, rollstuhlgängig

Gespräch & Filmvorführung mit Melanie Gilligan: 11. November 2022: 18–20 Uhr
Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien

Flux 1, dritter Stock
Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7
1030 Wien

economy (n.)
οἰκονόμος (i.e. "household management")
οἶκος ("house; household; home")
νέμω ("manage; distribute; to deal out; dispense")

Die aus einem Seminar an der Universität für angewandte Kunst Wien hervorgegangene Gruppenausstellung Backyard Economy zeigt zeitgenössische künstlerische Auseinandersetzungen mit den für die Ökonomie des globalen Kapitalismus grundlegenden, jedoch überwiegend unsichtbaren Formen sozialer Reproduktion. Der Titel zitiert zwei filmische Arbeiten von Martha Rosler – Backyard Economy I und Backyard Economy II (Diane Germaine mowing) (1974) –, in denen die Künstlerin reproduktive und künstlerische Arbeit verbindet. Frühe marxistisch-feministische Praxen der Institutionskritik nimmt die Ausstellung als Ausgangspunkt und perspektiviert sie auf gegenwärtige Verhältnisse. Die künstlerischen Arbeiten behandeln Dynamiken zwischen Repräsentation, der Arbeit an Produktionsbedingungen und Effekten der Institutionalisierung, und setzen dort an, wo Ausschlüsse und Ausgrenzungen (re-)produziert werden. Sie thematisieren Wechselwirkungen der Auf- und Abwertung, der Ausbeutung und des Profits inner- und außerhalb des Kunstfelds. Dabei fragen sie nach der zentralen Rolle binärer Konstruktionen, geschlechtsspezifischer Festschreibungen sowie (neo-)kolonialer Prägungen in reproduktiver Arbeit, Wertproduktion und Eigentumsverhältnissen und widmen sich so durchaus hartnäckigen Klischees. 

Mit Beiträgen von:

adO/Aptive collective, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, Tiffany Domke, Laura Egger-Karlegger, Samuel Ekeh, Andrea Fraser, Melanie Gilligan, Karrabing Film Collective, Elly Niebuhr, Laura S. Oyuela Flores, Lucie Pia , Falke Pisano, Martha Rosler, Alfred Soulek, Constantina Zavitsanos, Ella Zwatz, u.a.

eingeladen von Jenni Tischer & Stefanie Kitzberger

Lucie Pia’s Beitrag ist zu sehen bei Tiny Mutual Admiration Societies:

Abteilung für Malerei, 6. Stock, Raum 626

Oskar-Kokoschka-Platz 2

1010 Wien

Öffnungszeiten: Montag–Sonntag, 12–20 Uhr, 8. Dezember–15.Jänner 2022, freier Eintritt, rollstuhlgängig 

sponsored by the Danubian Bank 

www.kunstsammlungundarchiv.at 

https://kuw.uni-ak.ac.at/KunstundWissenstransfer/ 

https://tinymutualadmirationsocieties.uni-ak.ac.at/

Backyard Economy

November 5–December 23 2022

Opening: November 4 2022, 6pm

University Gallery Heiligenkreuzerhof

University of Applied Arts Vienna

Sala Terrena, ground floor, staircase 7
Schönlaterngasse 5
1010 Vienna

Hours: Wednesday–Saturday, 2–6 p.m., free admission, wheelchair accessible

Conversation & Screening with Melanie Gilligan: November 11 2022, 6–8 p.m. 

University of Applied Arts Vienna

Flux 1, third floor
Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7
1030 Vienna

economy (n.)
οἰκονόμος (i.e. "household management")
οἶκος ("house; household; home")
νέμω ("manage; distribute; to deal out; dispense")

The group exhibition Backyard Economy, which is the result of a seminar at the University of Applied Arts Vienna, presents contemporary artistic explorations of the forms of social reproduction, which are fundamental for the economy of global capitalism but remain largely invisible within it. The title quotes two super-8-films by Martha Rosler from 1974, Backyard Economy I and Backyard Economy II (Diane Germaine mowing), in which the artist draws an intimate connection between reproductive and artistic labor. The exhibition takes such early Marxist-feminist perspectives and practices of institutional critique as its point of departure and relates them to contemporary conditions. The works on display deal with motivs of the peripheral and of exclusion, thereby exploring dynamics that arise between forms of representation, the engagement within the conditions of (aesthetic) production, and the effects of institutionalization. They address interactions of valorization and devaluation, exploitation and profit both inside and outside the art field. By questioning binary constructions, gender-specific codifications, and colonial imprints at work in reproductive labor, value production, and property relations, the artistic works devote themselves to tackling quite persistent clichés. 

With contributions by:

adO/Aptive collective, Friedl Dicker-Brandeis, Tiffany Domke, Laura Egger-Karlegger, Samuel Ekeh, Andrea Fraser, Melanie Gilligan, Karrabing Film Collective, Elly Niebuhr, Laura S. Oyuela Flores, Lucie Pia , Falke Pisano, Martha Rosler, Alfred Soulek, Constantina Zavitsanos, Ella Zwatz, among others

Invited by Stefanie Kitzberger and Jenni Tischer

sponsored by the Danubian Bank 

Lucie Pia’s contribution is on view at Tiny Mutual Admiration Societies:

University of Applied Arts Vienna, Painting Department, 6th floor, room 626

Oskar-Kokoschka-Platz 2, 1010 Vienna

Hours: Monday–Sunday, 12 a.m.–8 p.m., December 8–January 15 2022, free admission, wheelchair accessible

Symposium „Abstraction & Economy“, at the University of Applied Arts, 28. – 30.April 2022



Photo Credits: Roozbeh Gholami

 

Poster by Falke Pisano, Katarina Schildgen & Paul Gasser, 2022

SAVE THE DATE: 28. - 30. April 2022 // SYMPOSIUM: ABSTRACTION AND ECONOMY 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://dieangewandte-at.zoom.us/j/63540238093?pwd=eFBLTy9hY2VDcHVNSE8wcldKMXFQQT09

Meeting ID: 635 4023 8093
Passcode: 403594

Place: University of Applied Arts, Vordere Zollamtsstrasse 7 (VZA7), 1030 Vienna

The symposium Abstraction and Economy examines the tension between abstraction and economy from different perspectives of art and architecture theory / history as well as law, sociology, philosophy and economics. Abstraction and Economy addresses questions about the current challenges of a global economy, with its claim to expansive growth in relation to aesthetics, technology and democracy. We ask about the role of art between concretion and abstraction, and discuss formalistic approaches to art theory with its assertion to autonomy, as well as the social and economic aspects that critical theory takes into account in order to track down the aesthetic regime of capitalism. 

The lecture series is organized by Eva Maria Stadler and Jenni Tischer, Department of Art & Knowledge Transfer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna.

 

Thursday, 28. April 2022 

MONEY AND ABSTRACTION

When it comes to the question of the origin of money, abstraction is not far away. Even the material value of land, gold and silver, but also the value of grain or the value of pigs and cattle, they are all tied to the symbol and the sign that are negotiated in the act of valuation. This transformation denotes an abstraction process in which the (im-)material object is translated into a value. After the replacement of the gold standard and the increasing importance of futures and options, digital currencies are increasingly taking over the function of money on the financial markets, giving the abstract another dimension. In the Abstraction and Economy series, we ask how artistic practices and theories have become inscribed in processes of abstraction and how they oppose their appropriation.

 

Place: Auditorium, Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7, 1030 Vienna

16:00 – 16:30 Introduction Eva Maria Stadler and Jenni Tischer (Vienna):

Moderation: Eva Maria Stadler

16:30 – 17:00 Film Screening: Anja Kirschner 

17:00 – 17:30 Lecture: Christina von Braun 

17:30 – 17:45 // BREAK //

17:45 – 18:15 Lecture: Leigh Claire La Berge 

18:15 – 19:00 Discussion

 

Friday, 29. April 2022

DEBT AND ABSTRACTION 

The second panel brings together theorists and artists who name and question value systems that are based on raciality and discrimination. The colonial history of property law led to discriminatory exclusions that are still effective today, which follow a logic of abstraction, such as the property register. The naming of a specific historical context like in this case the British colonial setting will help to understand, define and work against a logic taken as given. The narrative of endless economic growth is still very much tied to modern myths of a universality that potentially includes and reaches out to everyone, everywhere. In the panel we ask which aesthetic practices are linked to this narrative and which negate the structural inherence of unequal power relations. How can artistic and aesthetic practices counteract the current regime of accumulation and abstraction?

 

Place: Auditorium, Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7, 1030 Vienna

11:30 – 11:45 Welcoming: Gerald Bast

11:45 – 12:15 Beat Weber

Place: Austrian Postsavings Bank, Georg-Coch-Platz 2, 1010 Vienna

12:00 – 12:30 Note: Patricia Grzonka 

12:30 – 12:50 Presentation: adO/Aptive collective, The Störling, A Community Currency by The Danubian Bank
 

Auditorium, Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7, 1030 Vienna

Moderation: Stefanie Kitzberger 

16:00 – 16:30 Lecture: Brenna Bhandar

16:30 – 17:00 Lecture: Sven Lütticken 

17:00 – 17:30 Lecture: Karel Císař 

17:30 – 18:30 Discussion 

// Apéro //

19:00 – 19:30 Lecture: Gabriele Jutz 

19:30 – 19:45 Film Screening: Cauleen Smith 

 

Saturday, 30. April 2022

GRID AND ABSTRACTION

The Grid as symbolic form stands for the abstract ongoing processes of rationalization of labor, property, dynamics, but also for other aspects of live such as health, social reproduction and social activities which function just like the concrete electric grid as an infrastructural precondition of the capitalist regime. In the third panel of Abstraction and Economy we want to examine the Grid as formalistic and ideological concept in artistic and aesthetic practices and question its promise of endless growth based on implemented structural discrimination. Specific examples such as expropriation and classification of land, algorithmic filtering and pattern discrimination and the role of statistics for surveillance, will show that the grid is not against its understanding as the symbol of artistic modernism: self-referential, detached from reality, ahistorical, incapable of evolving, and anti-narrative. Are seriality, repetition, and the grid just economic operations in the service of rationalization, efficiency and growth, or are the aesthetic principles of the avant-garde, minimalism and conceptual art able to give a face to the fiction of the value of money?

Place: Seminarraum 21, Vordere Zollamtsstraße 7, 1030 Vienna

Moderation: Jenni Tischer 

10:30 – 11:00 Lecture: Sabeth Buchmann 

11:00 – 11:30 Lecture: Rebecca H. Quaytman 

11:30 – 11:45 // BREAK //

11:45 – 12:15 Lecture: Falke Pisano 

12:15 – 12:45 Lecture: Eva Kernbauer 

12:45 – 13:15 Lecture: Clemens Apprich 

13:15 – 13:45 Discussion

 

// Face Mask mandatory //

 


Poster by Falke Pisano, 2022

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=dAiKwyuLxGw

Please join us for two lectures by Marina Vishmidt and Markus Wissen on 30. March 2022 at 6pm CET on zoom!

Zoom access:

https://dieangewandte-at.zoom.us/j/63040134804?pwd=OW5ZbDhwRXdmTTlWZEJuWERweHdaZz09

ABSTRACTION AND ECONOMY

Marina Vishmidt

This lecture will depart from some of my previous work around art and exception in order to survey some of the consequences of thinking in terms of the significance of exceptions and externalities to both political ecology and the economic paradigms that have emerged to ‘value’ nature. It seems that from social reproduction feminist theory to climate investment models, the relationship between an activity or entity and the capitalist form of value needs to be established in order for it to be recognised and protected. At the same time, the creation of exceptions and externalities is seen as fundamental to how capitalism economies and societies function, from ‘surplus value’ in Marx’s analysis to the production of ‘cheap nature’ in Moore and many other contemporary theories that focus on the ‘ex-‘ of capital beyond exchange and exploitation (extraction, expropriation . . . ) This dynamic of inclusion and exclusion will be assessed from a strategic as well as a theoretical standpoint to see how we can move away from ‘accounting’ paradigms in emancipatory politics more generally, whether the question is framed in terms of socialist ecological transition or in critical aesthetics.

Bio: 
Marina Vishmidt is a writer and editor. She teaches at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her work has appeared in South Atlantic Quarterly, Artforum, Afterall, Journal of Cultural Economy, e-flux journal, Australian Feminist Studies, and Radical Philosophy, among others, as well as a number of edited volumes. She is currently editing a reader on speculation for the Documents of Contemporary Art series (Whitechapel/MIT 2022). She is the co-author of Reproducing Autonomy (with Kerstin Stakemeier) (Mute, 2016), and the author of Speculation as a Mode of Production: Forms of Value Subjectivity in Art and Capital (Brill 2018 / Haymarket 2019). She is a member of the Marxism in Culture collective and is on the board of the New Perspectives on the Critical Theory of Society series (Bloomsbury Academic). Currently she is the Rudolph Arnheim Visiting Professor in Art History at the Humboldt University in Berlin.

Markus Wissen

The ecological crisis is often described with concepts such as "Anthropocene" and "planetary boundaries". Behind this lie important scientific findings on the consequences of human impact on nature and on the imminent or already occurring disturbances of earth and ecosystem processes. At the same time, the concepts convey a strong message about the drama of the ecological crisis and the urgency of effective crisis management. They shake people up and accompany every climate conference with a warning. Therein lies one of their strengths. Their problematic aspects lie in what they do not say, from which they abstract, namely the social relations of class, gender, racial discrimination and colonial rule, which not only brought about the crisis, but also decide who will do what is affected. The lecture discusses these abstractions in emphasizing that arguing about the depiction and understanding of the ecological crisis is not a matter of academic sophistication. Rather, crisis representations have important political implications: They shape the corridor in which strategies for dealing with the problem are sought, favor some strategies and marginalize others, and thus produce power and dominance effects. One challenge is therefore to develop problem descriptions in an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary dialogue that make the conditions underlying the crisis visible and orientate the search for emancipatory ways out.

Bio:
Markus Wissen, Dr. phil., is Professor of Social Sciences with a focus on socio-ecological transformation processes at the Berlin School of Economics and Law (HWR) and Fellow at the Institute for Social Analysis of the Rosa Luxemburg Foundation. As a political scientist, he teaches and researches social relationships with nature, the imperial way of life and the socio-ecological transformation of automobility. At the Rosa-Luxemburg-Foundation he is spokesman for the graduate college “Crisis and socio-ecological transformation” and a member of the scientific advisory board and the discussion group on the future of cars, the environment and mobility. He is also the editor of PROKLAZeitschrift für kritische and member and former co-director of the Institute for International Political Economy Berlin (IPE) at the HWR. His publications include the book The Imperial Mode of Living. Everyday Life and the Ecological Crisis of Capitalism, London 2021: Verso, written together with Ulrich Brand.


Poster by Falke Pisano, 2022

https://youtu.be/XSXXJNglJxI

Please join us for two lectures by Brenna Bhandar and Sven Lütticken 
on 09.March 2022 at 6:30 pm CET on zoom!

ABSTRACTION AND ECONOMY

Zoom access:

https://dieangewandte-at.zoom.us/j/69391844367?pwd=eHFZMVc2a0dWaGdCYklCK05oVEVhdz09

The lecture series Abstraction and Economy takes place on the occasion of the move of the University of Applied Arts into the former Post Office Savings Bank in Vienna – a landmark of modern architecture by Otto Wagner. It examines the tension between abstraction and economy from different perspectives of art and architecture theory / history as well as law, philosophy and economics.
The lecture series addresses questions about the current challenges of a global economy, with its claim to expansive growth in relation to aesthetics, technology and democracy. We ask about the role of art between concretion and abstraction, and discuss formalistic approaches to art theory with its claim of autonomy, as well as the social and economic aspects that critical theory takes into account in order to track down the aesthetic regime of capitalism.

The lecture series is organized by Eva Maria Stadler and Jenni Tischer, Department of Art & Knowledge Transfer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna.

Brenna Bhandar:

Colonial laws of appropriation and relations of ownership were created through a series of forgeries that trafficked in the currency of legal fictions, and representations of land which bore little if any relation to the lived practices of use and political organisation that shaped territories that would be turned into property. Excavating the commodity logics of abstraction that emerged in conjunction with racial abstractions of colonised subjects, I will examine particular legal techniques that forged racial regimes of ownership in settler colonies. The heady mixture of negotiation, refusal, and resistance that shaped imperial modes of rule reveal their vulnerabilities and weaknesses, and ways of living that exceed colonial logics of abstraction.

Prior to joining Allard Law, University of British Columbia, Brenna Bhandar was a Reader in Law and Critical Theory at SOAS, University of London. Brenna’s research and teaching lie within the fields of property studies and legal theory, spanning the disciplines of property law, critical theory, colonial legal history and critical race feminism. Her book Colonial Lives of Property: Law Land and Racial Regimes of Ownershipwas published in 2018 with Duke University Press, and the co-edited book (with Rafeef Ziadah) Revolutionary Feminisms: Conversations on Collective Action and Radical Thought was published in 2020 with Verso. 

Sven Lütticken:

Prices and Other Values: Plans and Councils Against the Value-Form, 1920s and 2020s 

The period following WWI and the Russian Revolution (and the failed revolutions in Germany and elsewhere) was rich in schemes to create a post-capitalist, socialized economy. From Otto Neurath's proposals for a centrally planned economy in kind to the council communists' attempts theorize an economy in which production and exchange were organized through socialist bookkeeping, these projects attempted to transform capitalist real abstraction into different forms of quantification and accounting, devoid of exploitation and surplus value. If the ensuing "Socialist Calculation Debate" was framed, and consequently won, by neoliberal "free market" advocates such as Friedrich Hayek, today's renewal of the calculation debate has spawned proposals to use algorithmic tools for economic planning, and to create digital councils. Then as now, these debates have an important aesthetic dimension: how to imagine and shape the socialization of abstraction?  

Sven Lütticken teaches at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, where he coordinates the research masters’ track Critical Studies in Art and Culture. Forthcoming are his book Objections: Forms of Abstraction, Part 1 (Sternberg Press) and the critical reader Art and Autonomy (Afterall). 

 


Poster, Falke Pisano 2022

Please join us for two lectures by Nikita Dhawan and Christian Scherrer 
on 27. January 2022 at 6pm CET on zoom!

Zoom access:
https://dieangewandte-at.zoom.us/j/61476308512?pwd=WVlneVcxcW5uRk16Zk53cnYvWVN6dz09

The lecture series Abstraction and Economy takes place on the occasion of the move of the University of Applied Arts into the former Post Office Savings Bank in Vienna – a landmark of modern architecture by Otto Wagner. It examines the tension between abstraction and economy from different perspectives of art and architecture theory / history as well as law, philosophy and economics.
The lecture series addresses questions about the current challenges of a global economy, with its claim to expansive growth in relation to aesthetics, technology and democracy. We ask about the role of art between concretion and abstraction, and discuss formalistic approaches to art theory with its claim of autonomy, as well as the social and economic aspects that critical theory takes into account in order to track down the aesthetic regime of capitalism.

The lecture series is organized by Eva Maria Stadler and Jenni Tischer, Department of Art & Knowledge Transfer at the University of Applied Arts Vienna.

Nikita Dhawan

Considering the historical role of art in colonial and fascist regimes, can one entrust art with the task of emancipatory politics? Can art can make us political and ethical by provoking us out of our indifference and irresponsibility? Could critical artistic practices facilitate transnational justice and democracy, protecting and promoting human rights? Or should art be autonomous and non-purposive and not be put in service of political and ethical imperatives? Given that art functions within structures of capitalism and neo-colonialism, the political, social, economic role of artists, artistic practices and art institutions in current conditions of global inequality remains ambivalent and controversial. My talk will address the role of an aesthetic education (Spivak) in the pursuit of post-imperial global ethics and politics. Can the political labor of training the imagination mitigate imperialist, racist, orientalist and heteronormative structures and practices?

Bio: 
Nikita Dhawan is Professor of Political Theory and History of Ideas at the Technical University of Dresden. Her academic career began in Mumbai, India, where she studied philosophy and German studies as well as gender studies. After completing her doctorate in philosophy in 2006 at the Ruhr University Bochum, she took over the Maria Goeppert Mayer visiting professorship at the Institute for Political Science at the Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg and was then a post-doc fellow at the International Graduate Centre for the Study of Culture (GCSC) at the Justus Liebig University Giessen. Nikita Dhawan's main areas of research and interest are: Transnational Feminism, Global Justice, Human Rights, Democracy and Decolonization. Her publications include: »Impossible Speech: On the Politics of Silence and Violence« (2007), »Decolonizing Enlightenment: Transnational Justice, Human Rights and Democracy in a Postcolonial World« (2014, ed.) and together with María do Mar Castro Varela »Postcolonial Theory. A Critical Introduction« (2015).

Christian Scherrer

„Wer malt abstrakt?“ Eine sozio-ökonomische Geschichte europäischer Kunst nach Alexandre Kojève

Wie lässt sich „Abstraktion“ als kunstkritischer Begriff verstehen, wenn wir künstlerische Produktion vor ihrem ökonomischen und sozialen Hintergrund betrachten wollen, anstatt ausschließlich an die ungegenständliche Kunst der Moderne und ihre formalen Aspekte zu denken? Mein Vortrag widmet sich dieser Frage, indem er eine neue Lektüre jenes lange Zeit unbekannten Aufsatzes vorschlägt, den der Philosoph und Wirtschaftsdiplomat Alexandre Kojève 1936 über die Malerei seines Onkels Wassily Kandinsky schrieb. Ich lese Kojèves Versuch, die moderne non-repräsentationale Malerei nicht als „abstrakt“ sondern als „konkret“ zu begreifen, als vielversprechenden Entwurf einer materialistischen Kunstgeschichte, dessen implizite Orientierung am Marxismus hervorgehoben werden muss. Zugleich möchte ich zeigen, dass die kritische Auseinandersetzung mit Kojève als Ausgangspunkt für allgemeine Reflexionen darüber dienen kann, auf welche Weisen sich künstlerische Praktiken seit der Moderne der Abstraktion und Entfremdung von Arbeit unter gegenwärtigen sozio-ökonomischen Verhältnissen zu widersetzen versuchen.

Bio:
Christian Scherrer ist Kunsthistoriker in Wien. Er arbeitet aktuell an einer Dissertation zu Ideologien und formalen Entwicklungen der Abstraktionskritik in (neo-)symbolistischer Kunst und Poesie Frankreichs um 1900, mit Fokus auf den Kubismus im Werk Pablo Picassos und Max Jacobs. Bis 2016, Studium der Philosophie und Kunstpädagogik in Wien und Helsinki (Diplomarbeit zum Ausdrucksbegriff in der romantischen Tradition und Paul Cézannes Malerei). 2016-18, Lehre und Assistenz am Lehrstuhl für Kunst der Moderne der Universität Wien. Seit 2018, Mitglied der graduate school von eikones – Zentrum für Theorie und Geschichte des Bildes, an der Universität Basel. Seit 2019, doc-Stipendiat der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften. Publikationen und Vorträge u.a. zu Albert Oehlen, Adolf Loos, Georges Bataille und Friedl Dicker.

17.000 Eisenbolzen lügen nicht. 
Über Ökonomie, Abstraktion und Wahrheit in Otto Wagners Postsparkasse

Patricia Grzonka

Aufzeichnung:
https://youtu.be/ya4_Doqt0qc

 

Workshop by Jeremy Wade, 2021
FCCC (The Future Clinic for Critical Care)presents “Shitting My Brain Out / In Debt But Got A Gift Card / Making Art”
Initiiert von Eva Maria Stadler, Ulrike Payerhofer und Jenni Tischer
 

 

Care/Care-Work

Di, 〔15.6.〕, 〔10:00〕

 

Online
vom Haus der Barmherzigkeit

Diskurs
Site-Talk

Kunst und Wissenstransfer
mit dem UniNEtZ

Die Soziologin Brigitte Aulenbacher, die Leiterin der Geriatrie Carina Thallinger im Haus
der Barmherzigkeit, die Care-Arbeiterin Izabela Glowinska, der Student
und langjährige Mitarbeiter im „Haus Erna“ für betreutes Wohnen, Martin
Eckerstorfer und die Künstlerin Jenni Tischer gehen in einem von der
Kunsthistorikerin Eva Maria Stadler moderierten Gespräch den
verschiedenen Perspektiven soziologischer Analyse, Arbeitsrealität(en)
und künstlerischer Praxen auf Care Work nach.

 

Jeremy Wade: Love Is Not Romance, honey!

Lecture Performance von The Battlefield Nurse

Di, 〔22.6.〕, 〔19:00〕

Online
vom Platz vor dem Bundesamtsgebäude

Performance
Lecture Performance

Kunst und Wissenstransfer
mit dem UniNEtZ

Wo ist Liebe?? In einem unmöglichen möglichen politischen Ritual hat es Jeremy Wades 5000 Jahre alte Battlefield Nurse satt, wie wesentliche Begriffe wie Pflege, Reparatur und Liebe in der gewaltsamen Gegenwart im Stich gelassen worden sind. Wir brauchen Liebe, die als eine Kraft der Unabhängigkeit den intimen Fremden und allen irdischen Geschöpfen dienen soll. Singe es! Die Battlefield Nurse wird eine partizipatorische Intervention anleiten, ein erfundenes politisches Ritual, das Liebe als eine hyperrelationale Ethik neu positioniert.